• Blog Stats

    • 76,711 hits
  • Blog policy

    This blog provides information about artists and musical works. If you like the music and/or the info, please, support the original artists and buy their records. This blog does not store or host any copyrighted material and does not support piracy. This blog does not accept any kind of messages containing any type of insults nor any offensive comments. Blog administrators reserve the right to delete comments that do not comply with those requirements.
  • Categories

  • Top Posts

  • Recent Comments

    victor on Johann Sebastian Bach –…
    Like on Ludwig Van Beethoven – 9…
    anonymousremains on Jacques Ibert – Piano…
    iok on Charles Gounod – Faust…
    tony van Grinsven on Post with not working lin…
  • February 2009
    M T W T F S S
        Mar »
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    232425262728  
  • Meta

Johan Sebastian Bach – Sonatas And Partitas For Solo Violin

Johan Sebastian Bach – Sonatas And Partitas For Solo Violin
Recorded in Vienna on July 12-15 and September 7-10, 1999

About the work:
Bach composed the works in 1720, while employed at Köthen. The manuscript was nearly destroyed but someone saved it from being used as butcher paper. There, Bach composed more chamber music than sacred or choral music; the Brandenburg Concertos, concerto for two violins, and cello suites were all composed about this time.
The original performer of Bach’s six sonatas and partitas is unknown. Johann Georg Pisendel and Jean-Baptiste Volumier have been suggested, both being talented violinists at the Dresden court, as has Joseph Spiess, leader of the orchestra at Cöthen, where Bach composed the works. However, some contend that it may have been Bach himself who gave the first performance, pointing to his skills as a violinist. His father, Johann Ambrosius Bach, was a violinist, and according to his son Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, “in his youth, and until the approach of old age, he played the violin cleanly and powerfully”.
The sonatas each consist of four movements, in the slow-fast-slow-fast movement pattern of the sonata da chiesa, with the second movement as a fugue. The partitas are suites of dance movements, making use of the usual baroque pattern of allemande, courante, sarabande, and gigue, with some omissions and the addition of galanteries. Many scholars and performers, like contemporary violinist Christian Tetzlaff, believe these works to be one whole idea, “like a big Bruckner symphony,” he said. He also has a theory about the meaning of these works: He describes the three sonatas as religious works depicting the Christmas story, the Passion of Christ, and the Resurrection. The three partitas, on the other hand, in his opinion are the more “earthly” side of life, dances and songs. However, the two meet in the D Minor Partita, especially in the Chaccone, a personal requiem to his late wife Maria Barbara.

Track List:
cd1
01. Sonata N. 1 In G Minor BWV 1001, I Adagio (4:08)
02. Sonata N. 1 In G Minor BWV 1001, II Fuga Allegro (5:05)
03. Sonata N. 1 In G Minor BWV 1001, III Siciliana (3:04)
04. Sonata N. 1 In G Minor BWV 1001, IV Presto (3:28)
05. Partita N. 1 In B Minor BWV 1002, I Allemanda (5:47)
06. Partita N. 1 In B Minor BWV 1002, I Double (2:22)
07. Partita N. 1 In B Minor BWV 1002, II Corrente (3:04)
08. Partita N. 1 In B Minor BWV 1002, II Double Presto (3:11)
09. Partita N. 1 In B Minor BWV 1002, III Sarabanda (3:48)
10. Partita N. 1 In B Minor BWV 1002, III Double (2:18)
11. Partita N. 1 In B Minor BWV 1002, IV Tempo Die Borea (3:27)
12. Partita N. 1 In B Minor BWV 1002, IV Double (3:18)
13. Sonata N. 2 In A Minor BWV 1003, I Grave (3:58)
14. Sonata N. 2 In A Minor BWV 1003, II Fuga (7:29)
15. Sonata N. 2 In A Minor BWV 1003, III Andante (4:17)
16. Sonata N. 2 In A Minor BWV 1003, IV Allegro (5:19)
cd2
01. Partita N.2 In D Minor BWV 1004, I Allemanda (4:13)
02. Partita N.2 In D Minor BWV 1004, II Corrente (2:28)
03. Partita N.2 In D Minor BWV 1004, IIISarabanda (4:22)
04. Partita N.2 In D Minor BWV 1004, IV Giga (3:41)
05. Partita N.2 In D Minor BWV 1004, V Ciacona (12:52)
06. Sonata N.3 In C Major BWV 1005, I Adagio (4:39)
07. Sonata N.3 In C Major BWV 1005, II Fuga (10:11)
08. Sonata N.3 In C Major BWV 1005, III Largo (3:16)
09. Sonata N.3 In C Major BWV 1005, IV Allegro Assai (5:05)
10. Partita N.3 In E Major BWV 1005, I Preludio (3:20)
11. Partita N.3 In E Major BWV 1005, IILaure (4:16)
12. Partita N.3 In E Major BWV 1005, IIIGavotte En Rondeau (2:54)
13. Partita N.3 In E Major BWV 1005, IVMenuet I (1:42)
14. Partita N.3 In E Major BWV 1005, IVMenuet II (2:38)
15. Partita N.3 In E Major BWV 1005, V Bourée (1:20)
16. Partita N.3 In E Major BWV 1005, VIGigue (2:08)

The Player:
Benjamin Schmid: violin

Born in 1968, violinist Benjamin Schmid studied music at Salzburg, Vienna and at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia and has attended master classes with Sandòr Végh, Nathan Milstein, Ivry Gitlis, and Dorothy DeLay. He has won first prize at international competitions in Paris, the USA, Germany, and South Africa. In 1992, he won the 1st Prize, Mozart-Prize, Beethoven-Prize and Audience-Prize at the Carl Flesch International in London and since has developed an international career playing with many of the world’s Benjamin Schmidleading orchestras and conductors. As a soloist, Benjamin has performed under the baton of conductors such as Sylvain Cambreling, Vladimir Fedosejev, Hans Graf, Eliahu Inbal, Yehudi Menuhin (with whom he also gave a spectacular debut as duo partner in J.S. Bach’s Double Concerto), Franz Welser-Most, Michael Schoenwandt, Saulius Sondeckis, Horst Stein, Ralf Weikert, Marcello Viotti, Daniele Gatti and Dennis Russell Davis. He has appeared with several prominent orchestras including the Chamber Orchestra of Europe, Orchestre de Paris, Orchestre National de France, Philharmonia Orchestra London, Bavarian State Orchestra, Czech Philharmonic, Bamberg Symphony, St. Petersburg Philharmonic, RSO Moscow (Tschaikovsky Symphony Orchestra), the Indianapolis Symphony, Vienna Symphony, RSO-Wien, the Salzburg Camerata and the Mozarteum Orchestra Salzburg.

mp3, 320 kbps, cd ripping, 133:08 minutes, Covers & info included.

Part1 —–   Part2 —–   Part3 —–   Part4

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: