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Ludwig Van Beethoven – 9 Symphonien (legendary Karajan’s, 1963)


Ludwig Van Beethoven – 9 SYmphonien (Herbert Von Karajan, 1963)
Recorded at The Jesus-Christus-Kirche, Berlin between December 1961 and November 1962.

Coments:

  • By general consensus, Herbert von Karajan’s first (1963) Beethoven cycle for Deutsche Grammophon is the best of the four (!) that he recorded. The Berlin Philharmonic was in top form, and they had not yet made an artistic fetish out of the bland smoothness that typified the conductor’s later recordings of this music (and just about everything else). Karajan’s squeaky clean, emotionally cool Beethoven will always be something of an acquired taste, but this set makes the best possible case for it. –David Hurwitz
  • This celebrated set, recorded in 1961-62, is generally considered the best of Herbert von Karajan’s four Beethoven symphony cycles. (His cycles from the 1950s, 1970s, and 1980s are also available.) Karajan had trained the Berlin Philharmonic to produce an ultra-smooth sound — the conductor’s trademark — yet their playing crackles with energy. The recorded sound has held up amazingly well, especially in this latest remastering…Barnes & Noble
  • Herbert von Karajan recorded the symphonies of Beethoven four times in his remarkable career — once with the Philharmonia in the Fifties and three times with the Berlin Philharmonic (1961-2, 1975-7, 1982-5). In many ways, his 60s cycle stands out from the other three. It was the first recording of the Nine to be conceived, planned and sold as an integral set. The initial purchasers had to pay a subscription for the LPs which were sent to them symphony by symphony. Thirty-six years later, this cycle has become somewhat of a benchmark for these cornerstones of the symphonic repartoire.Upon first hearing, I was struck by the tremendous enthusiasm in the playing of the orchestra. I can just imagine the excitement in the recording sessions, one of the finest orchestras of the time conducted by this energetic conductor at the start of what was to become a long tenure. This notion of a great event must have added a frisson to the atmosphere, and it certainly shows here…Isaak Koh
  • Ah, fame! Beethoven is such a ubiquitous presence that even gangsters, immigrants, and devotees of Mantovani know his name, while bankers, rock hounds and mental patients will regale you with the joke about the origin of the Fifth Symphony in a landlady’s odd laugh — Ha-ha-ha-huh! And because so much of his work is surefire, it communicates even when performed by bush league bands and amateurs. Which is to say that he is both superficially known and badly overexposed. As the trunk of the mighty Beethoven tree, the symphonies have been heard so often that, often, they are hardly heard at all. Ha-ha-ha-huh-ho hum. The glut of new Beethoven symphony recordings never ceases — the flood, at least, lasted but 40 days and 40 nights. The original instruments craze promised to deliver Beethoven’s work with pristine authenticity by taking us back to limitations the composer manifestly sought to transcend. Meanwhile, we rummage among the rich trove of artifacts left by the great interpreters of the past — Mengelberg, Toscanini, Klemperer, Furtwangler — for revelations of the divine spark animating these Promethean works, and we find them inseparable from the flat, primitive technology of their era. But every generation presents us with a tiny elite of interpretive genius and Herbert von Karajan, born in 1908, had the great good fortune of having been born into a time and place in which his native gifts could play upon a rich inheritance. In the early 1960s, when these recordings were made, Karajan was in his vigorous mid-fifties, only recently at the helm of the Berlin Philharmonic — which he had already made his own— and playing to a superb recording technology which digitalization only gussies up a bit. A bloom attended everything he touched. Want the revolutionary Beethoven in all his power and his glory? Try Karajan in his prime…Adrian Corleonis

Artists:

Track List:

cd1:
1. Symphony no.1 in C major, op.21 – Adagio molto. Allegro con brio (9:33)
2. Symphony no.1 in C major, op.21 – Andante cantabile con moto (5:53)
3. Symphony no.1 in C major, op.21 – Menuetto. Allegro molto e vivace (3:57)
4. Symphony no.1 in C major, op.21 – Adagio – Allegro molto e vivace (5:51)
5. Symphony no.3 in E flat major, op.5 – Allegro con brio (14:48)
6. Symphony no.3 in E flat major, op.5 – Marcia funebre. Adagio assai (17:10)
7. Symphony no.3 in E flat major, op.5 – Scherzo. Allegro vivace (5:48)
8. Symphony no.3 in E flat major, op.5 – Finale. Allegro molto (12:20)
cd2:
1. Symphony no.2 in D major, op.36 – Adagio. Allegro con brio (10:21)
2. Symphony no.2 in D major, op.36 – Larghetto (10:36)
3. Symphony no.2 in D major, op.36 – Scherzo. Allegro (3:53)
4. Symphony no.2 in D major, op.36 – Allegro molto (6:28)
5. Symphony no.4 in B major, op.60 – Adagio. Allegro vivace (9:54)
6. Symphony no.4 in B major, op.60 – Adagio (9:58)
7. Symphony no.4 in B major, op.60 – Allegro vivace (5:45)
8. Symphony no.4 in B major, op.60 – Allegro ma non troppo (5:23)
cd3:
1. Symphony no. in C minor, op.67 – Allegro con brio (7:19)
2. Symphony no. in C minor, op.67 – Andante con moto (10:05)
3. Symphony no. in C minor, op.67 – Allegro (4:54)
4. Symphony no. in C minor, op.67 – Allegro (9:07)
5. Symphony n.6 in F major, op.68 ‘Pastorale’ – Allegro ma non troppo (9:01)
6. Symphony n.6 in F major, op.68 ‘Pastorale’ – Andante molto mosso (11:36)
7. Symphony n.6 in F major, op.68 ‘Pastorale’ – Allegro (3:02)
8. Symphony n.6 in F major, op.68 ‘Pastorale’ – Allegro (3:25)
9. Symphony n.6 in F major, op.68 ‘Pastorale’ – Allegretto (8:46)
cd4:
1. Symphony No.7 in A major, op.92: I. Poco sostenuto · Vivace (11:27)
2. Symphony No.7 in A major, op. 92: II. Allegretto (8:01)
3. Symphony No.7 in A major, Op.92: III. Presto (7:50)
4. Symphony No.7 in A major, Op.92: IV. Allegro con brio (6:46)
5. Symphony No.8 in F major, op.93: I. Allegro vivace e con brio (9:20)
6. Symphony No.8 in F major, Op.93 – II. Allegretto scherzando (3:58)
7. Symphony No.8 in F major, Op.93 – III. Tempo di menuetto (5:58)
8. Symphony No.8 in F major, Op.93 – IV. Allegro vivace (7:06)
cd5:
1. Symphony no.9 in D minor, Op.125 “Choral” – I. Allegro ma non troppo, un poco maestoso (15:32)
2. Symphony no.9 in D minor, Op.125 “Choral” – II. Molto vivace (11:03)
3. Symphony no.9 in D minor, Op.125 “Choral” – III. Adagio molto e cantabile (16:28)
4. Symphony no.9 in D minor, Op.125 “Choral” – IVa. Presto (6:22)
5. Symphony no.9 in D minor, Op.125 “Choral” – IVb. Presto · “O Freunde, nicht diese Töne!” · Allegro assai (17:34)

Stereo, ADD, mp3, 320 kbps CBR, 5 hours 32 minutes. Covers, pictures & full info included.


cd1 Part1cd1 Part2
cd2 Part1cd2 Part2
cd3 Part1cd3 Part2
cd4 Part1cd4 Part2

cd5 Part1cd5 Part2

Scans

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – 4 Horn & Bassoon Concertos


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – 4 Horn & Bassoon Concertos

Recorded in New York on March & December, 1987.

About these works:
The Bassoon Concerto in B flat major (K. 191), written in 1774 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, is the most standard piece in the entire bassoon repertory. Nearly all professional bassoonists will perform the piece at some stage in their career, and it is probably the most commonly requested piece in orchestral auditions – it is usually requested that the player perform the excerpts from concerto’s first two movements in every audition. Although the autograph is lost, the exact date of the finishing is known: 4 June 1774. Mozart wrote the bassoon concerto when he was 18 years old, and it was his first concerto for wind instruments. Although it is believed that it was commissioned by an aristocratic amateur bassoon player Thaddäus Freiherr von Dürnitz, who owned seventy-four works by Mozart, this is a claim that is supported by little evidence. Scholars believe that Mozart wrote perhaps three bassoon concerti, but that only the first has survived.

Horn Concerto No. 2 in E-flat major, K. 417 was completed in 1783. The work is in three movements: Allegro maestoso, Andante & Rondo Più allegro. Mozart’s good-natured ribbing of his friend is evident in the manuscript inscription “W. A. Mozart took pity on Leitgeb, as, ox and fool in Vienna on 27 May 1783.” This is one of two horn concerti of Mozart to omit bassoons. It is also one of Mozart’s two horn concerti to have ripieno horns (horns included in the orchestra besides the soloist), though in contrast to K. 495, the solo horn in this one does not duplicate the first ripieno horn’s part in the tutti passages.

Horn Concerto No. 1 in D major, K. 412/386b was completed in 1791. The work is in two movements. This is one of two horn concerti of Mozart to include bassoons (the other is K. 447), but in this one he “treats them indifferently in the first movement.” It is the only one of Mozart’s horn concerti to be in D major (the rest are in E-flat major) and the only one to have just two movements instead of the usual three. Although numbered first, this was actually the last of the four to be completed. Compared to the other three concertos, it is shorter in duration (two movements rather than three), and is much simpler in regard to both range and technique, perhaps in a nod to Leitgeb’s, the horn player and Mozart’s great friend, advanced age and (presumably) reduced capabilities at the time of composition. The second movement was shown by Alan Tyson to have been finished by Mozart’s student Franz Xaver Süssmayr after Mozart’s death.

Horn Concerto No. 3 in E-flat major, K. 447 was completed between 1784 and 1787, during the Vienna Period. The composition was written as a friendly gesture for the hornist Joseph Leutgeb (his name is mentioned few times in the score), and Mozart probably didn’t consider it as particularly important, since he failed to enter it to the autograph catalogue of his works. The autograph score remained well preserved, it is stored in the British Library in London.

Horn Concerto No. 4 in E-flat major, K. 495 was completed in 1786. The work is in three movements. The manuscript, written in red, green, blue, and black ink, was formerly considered as a jocular attempt to rattle the intended performer, Mozart’s friend Joseph Leutgeb. However, recently it was suggested, that the multicolored score may be also a kind of “color code”. The last movement is a “quite obvious” example of the hunt topic, “in which the intervallic construction, featuring prominent tonic and dominant triads in the main melody, was to some degree dictated by the capability of the horn, and so was more closely allied with the original ‘pure’ characteristics of the ‘chasse’ as an open-air hunting call.” This concerto is one of Mozart’s two horn concerti to have ripieno horns (horns included in the orchestra besides the soloist), though in contrast to K. 417, the solo horn in this one duplicates the first ripieno horn’s part in the tutti passages.

Artists & Track List:

Stereo, DDD, 320 kbps, 186.41 Mb, 74:04 minutes. Covers & info included.

Part1 —–   Part2

Este es para “tete”

George Frideric Händel – L’Allegro, Il Penseroso Ed Il Moderato


George Frideric Händel – L’Allegro, Il Penseroso Ed Il Moderato

Recorded in Paris in 2000.

About this work:
L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato (HWV 55) is a pastoral ode by George Frideric Handel based on the poetry of John Milton. Handel composed the work over the period of 19 January to 4 February 1740, and the work was premiered on 27 February 1740 at the Royal Theatre of Lincoln’s Inn Fields. One of Handel’s librettists, Charles Jennens, arranged Milton’s two poems, L’Allegro and il Penseroso, interleaving them to create dramatic tension between the personified characters of Milton’s poems (L’Allegro or the “Joyful man” and il Penseroso or the “Contemplative man”). The first two movements consist of this dramatic dialog between Milton’s poems. In an attempt to unite the two poems into a singular “moral design”, Jennens added a new poem, “il Moderato”, to create a third movement. In 1988, Mark Morris choreographed a dance performance to accompany the music and poetry.

The Artists:

Track List:

Stereo, DDD, mp3, 320 kbps, 299.20 Mb, 1 hours 48 minutes. Covers & info included.

Part1 —–  Part2 —–  Part3

Giuseppe Verdi – From La Scala: Don Carlo


Giuseppe Verdi – From La Scala: Don Carlo

Recorded between July and September 1961.

About this collection of operas from La Scala:
Between 1960 and 1981, the music label Deutsche Grammophon recorded the eight greatest operas composed by Verdi at La Scala in Milan, the home of Italian operas. World’s leading singers and conductors were involved in the recording. The result provides you with the best possible way to get familiar with Verdi’s operas.

About this opera:
Don Carlos is a five-act Grand Opera composed by Giuseppe Verdi to a French language libretto by Camille du Locle and Joseph Méry, based on the dramatic play Don Carlos, Infant von Spanien (“Don Carlos, Infante of Spain”) by Friedrich Schiller. The story is based on conflicts in the life of Carlos, Prince of Asturias (1545-1568) after his betrothed Elisabeth of Valois was married instead to his father Philip II of Spain as part of the peace treaty ending the Italian War of 1551-1559 between the Houses of Habsburg and Valois.
It received its first performance at the Théâtre Impérial de l’Opéra on 11 March 1867. Over the next twenty years, cuts and additions were made to the opera, resulting in a number of versions being available to directors and conductors. No other Verdi opera exists in so many versions. At its full-length (including the ballet and the cuts made before the first performance), it contains about four hours of music, and is Verdi’s longest opera.
Performances of Don Carlos/Don Carlo in the first half of the twentieth century were rare, but in the post Second World War period it has been regularly performed, particularly in the four-act 1883 ‘Milanese’ version. Following the notable 1958 staging of the 1886 five-act Italian version at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden (director Luchino Visconti), this version has increasingly been performed elsewhere and has been recorded by, among others, Georg Solti and Carlo Maria Giulini.
Finally, stagings and recordings of the original five-act French version of the opera have become more frequent, performances having been given at the Teatro alla Scala in 1970 featuring Plácido Domingo with Katia Ricciarelli, at the Théâtre du Châtelet in 1996, with Roberto Alagna as Don Carlos (which has been released on CD and DVD), and at the San Francisco Opera in 2003. A five-act version with the parts not performed in the first Paris première (all the pre-première cuts) was staged at Staatsoper, Vienna (2006) and at Liceu, Barcelona; its conductor was Bertrand de Billy.

The Artists:

Track  List:

Stereo, ADD, mp3, 320 kbps, 461.17 Mb, 3 hours 9 minutes. Covers, info & synopsis included.

Part1 —–   Part2 —–   Part3 —–   Part4 —–   Part5

Joseph Haydn – L’Isola Disabitata (Eszterházy Opera Cycle)


Joseph Haydn –  L’Isola Disabitata

Recorded at The Grand Salle, Epalinges, Switzerland on May 1977

About this Opera:
L’isola disabitata (“The Desert Island”), Hob. 28/9, is an opera (azione teatrale in due parte) by Joseph Haydn, his tenth opera, written for the Eszterházy court and premiered December 6, 1779. The libretto by Pietro Metastasio was previously set by Giuseppe Bonno and subsequently used by Manuel García. Nino Rota has set excerpts to music as well. Haydn’s work has long been remembered for its dramatic Sturm und Drang ouverture, but the rest of the opera did not see print until H. C. Robbins Landon’s 1976 rental edition. A new edition by Tom Busse is to be published on the net in October 2007. The piece is striking for using orchestral accompagnati throughout. There is also a libretto of the same title by Carlo Goldoni (using the pen name Polisseno Fegeio), set by Giuseppe Scarlatti in 1757; it concerns a Chinese woman and Dutch sailors and was revived in 1760 (and again in Vienna in 1773) under the title La cinese smarrita.

The Artists:

Track List:
cd1
1. Parte Prima: Sinfonia (8:08)
2. parte prima: Recitativo (Qual contrasto non vince) (3:20)
3. parte prima: Recitativo (Ah germana! Ah Constanza!) (7:32)
4. parte prima: No.1. Aria (Se non piange un’infelice) (4:40)
5. parte prima: Recitativo (Che ostinato dolor!) (2:22)
6. parte prima: Recitativo (Ma sarà poi, Gernando) (3:56)
7. parte prima: No.2. Aria (Chi nel cammin d’onore) (3:55)
8. parte prima: Recitativo (Che fu mai quel ch’io vidi?) (1:39)
9. parte prima: No.3. Aria (Fra un dolce deliro) (4:12)
cd2
1. parte seconda: Recitativo (Ah presaga fu l’alma) (6:47)
2. parte seconda: No.4 Aria (Non turbar quand’io mi lagno (4:30)
3. parte seconda: Recitativo (Non s’irriti fra’ primi) (6:02)
4. parte seconda: No.5. Aria (Come il vapor s’ascende) (3:41)
5. parte seconda: No.6. Aria (Ah, che invan per me pietoso) (4:50)
6. parte seconda: Recitativo (Giacché da me lontana) (0:23)
7. parte seconda: No.7 Aria (Giacché il pietoso amico) (7:38)
8. parte seconda: Recitativo (COnstanza…Constanza?) (3:47)
9. parte seconda: No.8. Quartetto (Sono contenta appieno) (10:39)

Stereo, mp3, 320 kbps, ADD, 82:01 minutes. Covers, info & synopsis included.

Part1 —–  Part2 —–  Part3

Giuseppe Verdi – From La Scala. Un Ballo In Maschera


Giuseppe Verdi – From La Scala. Un Ballo In Maschera

Recorded in 1961.

About this collection of operas from La Scala:
Between 1960 and 1981, the music label Deutsche Grammophon recorded the eight greatest operas composed by Verdi at La Scala in Milan, the home of Italian operas. World’s leading singers and conductors were involved in the recording. The result provides you with the best possible way to get familiar with Verdi’s operas.

About this opera:
Un ballo in maschera (A Masked Ball), is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi with text by Antonio Somma. The opera’s first production was at the Teatro Apollo, Rome, 17 February 1859.
The opera is based on the assassination of King Gustav III of Sweden, but is not historically accurate. During its composition, Verdi was asked by government censors to make many changes to the opera due to its politically sensitive subject matter. Among these changes is a transportation of the setting to Boston, Massachusetts. Despite its tragic conclusion, Un ballo in maschera has many moments of the brilliance and irony associated with comedy — a mixture which has led critics to label it “Shakespearean.”
In 1792, the King of Sweden, Gustav III, was killed, the result of a political conspiracy against him. He was shot while attending a masked ball and died 13 days later from his wounds. It is on this episode that Verdi’s Masked Ball is loosely based; however, very little historical truth is contained in Verdi’s opera.
In 1833, the French playwright Eugène Scribe wrote about Gustav in a play called Gustave III. He retained the names of some of the historical figures involved, the conspiracy, and the killing at the masked ball. The rest of the play — the characterizations, the romance, the fortune-telling, etc. — is Scribe’s invention; and it is Scribe’s play that is the source of the story in Verdi’s opera.
Scribe’s play was well known and had been used by other composers, including Auber, as the basis for operas. However, the censors were still wary of it, since it showed the assassination of a king in a recent period of European history. During composition, the censors in Naples, where Verdi’s opera was to be performed, required extensive changes, eventually demanding more alterations than the composer was willing to make. Therefore, he broke his contract and was sued by the management of the Teatro San Carlo, thus provoking him to lodge a counter-claim against the theater for damages. Eventually, the legal fight ended with the house’s charges being withdrawn, freeing Verdi to offer the opera to the Rome Opera house.
But the Roman censors also wanted to make changes. Finally it was agreed that the setting would be moved from Europe, and the rank of the leading character would be reduced from king to colonial governor. So it was that the setting of the opera is Boston during the British colonial period, and the leading character is Riccardo, the Count (or Earl) of Warwick.
This opera was first seen in New York its US premiere on 11 February 1861 and in the UK on 15 June of that year. In the 20th century, especially after a 1935 production in Copenhagen, many modern stagings have restored the original Swedish setting and characters´ names. On 7 January 1955, Marian Anderson, singing the role of Ulrica, broke the “color barrier” at the Metropolitan Opera, becoming the first African-American artist ever to appear with that company. Today, the opera is performed regularly.

The Players:

Track List:

Stereo, ADD, mp3, 320 kbps, 304.65 Mb, 2 hours 4 minutes. Covers, info & synopsis included.

Part1 —–   Part2 —–   Part3 —–   Part4