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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – 4 Horn & Bassoon Concertos

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – 4 Horn & Bassoon Concertos

Recorded in New York on March & December, 1987.

About these works:
The Bassoon Concerto in B flat major (K. 191), written in 1774 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, is the most standard piece in the entire bassoon repertory. Nearly all professional bassoonists will perform the piece at some stage in their career, and it is probably the most commonly requested piece in orchestral auditions – it is usually requested that the player perform the excerpts from concerto’s first two movements in every audition. Although the autograph is lost, the exact date of the finishing is known: 4 June 1774. Mozart wrote the bassoon concerto when he was 18 years old, and it was his first concerto for wind instruments. Although it is believed that it was commissioned by an aristocratic amateur bassoon player Thaddäus Freiherr von Dürnitz, who owned seventy-four works by Mozart, this is a claim that is supported by little evidence. Scholars believe that Mozart wrote perhaps three bassoon concerti, but that only the first has survived.

Horn Concerto No. 2 in E-flat major, K. 417 was completed in 1783. The work is in three movements: Allegro maestoso, Andante & Rondo Più allegro. Mozart’s good-natured ribbing of his friend is evident in the manuscript inscription “W. A. Mozart took pity on Leitgeb, as, ox and fool in Vienna on 27 May 1783.” This is one of two horn concerti of Mozart to omit bassoons. It is also one of Mozart’s two horn concerti to have ripieno horns (horns included in the orchestra besides the soloist), though in contrast to K. 495, the solo horn in this one does not duplicate the first ripieno horn’s part in the tutti passages.

Horn Concerto No. 1 in D major, K. 412/386b was completed in 1791. The work is in two movements. This is one of two horn concerti of Mozart to include bassoons (the other is K. 447), but in this one he “treats them indifferently in the first movement.” It is the only one of Mozart’s horn concerti to be in D major (the rest are in E-flat major) and the only one to have just two movements instead of the usual three. Although numbered first, this was actually the last of the four to be completed. Compared to the other three concertos, it is shorter in duration (two movements rather than three), and is much simpler in regard to both range and technique, perhaps in a nod to Leitgeb’s, the horn player and Mozart’s great friend, advanced age and (presumably) reduced capabilities at the time of composition. The second movement was shown by Alan Tyson to have been finished by Mozart’s student Franz Xaver Süssmayr after Mozart’s death.

Horn Concerto No. 3 in E-flat major, K. 447 was completed between 1784 and 1787, during the Vienna Period. The composition was written as a friendly gesture for the hornist Joseph Leutgeb (his name is mentioned few times in the score), and Mozart probably didn’t consider it as particularly important, since he failed to enter it to the autograph catalogue of his works. The autograph score remained well preserved, it is stored in the British Library in London.

Horn Concerto No. 4 in E-flat major, K. 495 was completed in 1786. The work is in three movements. The manuscript, written in red, green, blue, and black ink, was formerly considered as a jocular attempt to rattle the intended performer, Mozart’s friend Joseph Leutgeb. However, recently it was suggested, that the multicolored score may be also a kind of “color code”. The last movement is a “quite obvious” example of the hunt topic, “in which the intervallic construction, featuring prominent tonic and dominant triads in the main melody, was to some degree dictated by the capability of the horn, and so was more closely allied with the original ‘pure’ characteristics of the ‘chasse’ as an open-air hunting call.” This concerto is one of Mozart’s two horn concerti to have ripieno horns (horns included in the orchestra besides the soloist), though in contrast to K. 417, the solo horn in this one duplicates the first ripieno horn’s part in the tutti passages.

Artists & Track List:

Stereo, DDD, 320 kbps, 186.41 Mb, 74:04 minutes. Covers & info included.

Part1 —–   Part2

Este es para “tete”

One Response

  1. thanks a lot!

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