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Joaquín Rodrigo – Concierto De Aranjuez


Joaquín Rodrigo – Concierto De Aranjuez

Recorded at the Concert Hall of the CSSR Philharmonic, Košice, from 11th to 16th of Novembre 1988

About this work:
The Concierto de Aranjuez is a composition for classical guitar and orchestra by the Spanish composer Joaquín Rodrigo. Written in 1939, it is probably Rodrigo’s best-known work, and its success established his reputation as one of the most significant Spanish composers of the twentieth century. The Concierto de Aranjuez was inspired by the gardens at Palacio Real de Aranjuez, the spring resort palace and gardens built by Philip II in the last half of the 16th century and rebuilt in the middle of the 18th century by Ferdinand VI. The work attempts to transport the listener to another place and time through the evocation of the sounds of nature. According to the composer, the first movement is “animated by a rhythmic spirit and vigour without either of the two themes… interrupting its relentless pace”; the second movement “represents a dialogue between guitar and solo instruments (cor anglais, bassoon, oboe, horn etc.)”; and the last movement “recalls a courtly dance in which the combination of double and triple time maintains a taut tempo right to the closing bar.” He described the concerto itself as capturing “the fragrance of magnolias, the singing of birds, and the gushing of fountains” in the gardens of Aranjuez. Rodrigo and his wife Victoria stayed silent for many years about the inspiration for the second movement, and thus the popular belief grew that was inspired by the bombing of Guernica in 1937. In her autobiography, Victoria eventually declared that it was both an evocation of the happy days of their honeymoon and a response to Rodrigo’s devastation at the miscarriage of their first pregnancy. It was composed in 1939 in Paris. Rodrigo dedicated the Concierto de Aranjuez to Regino Sainz de la Maza. Rodrigo, blind since age three, was a pianist. He did not play the guitar, yet he still managed to capture the spirit of the guitar in Spain.

The Artists:
CSSR State Philharmonic of Košice
Peter Breiner: conductor
Gerald García: guitar

Track List:
01. Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez (Allegro con Spirito) (6:33)
02. Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez (Adagio) (10:56)
03. Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez (Allegro Gentile) (5:51)
04. Albeniz: Zambra Granadina (5:10)
05. Granados: Zapateado (from Cantos) (7:10)
06. Granados: Spanish Dance No. 2 (5:41)
07. Granados: Spanish Dance No. 8 (4:29)
08. Granados: Spanish Dance No. 6 (5:48)
09. Granados: Spanish Dance No. 11 (8:20)
10. Albeniz: Asturias (5:04)
11. Falla: Spanish Pieces (Aragonesa No. 1) (3:42)

Stereo, DDD, mp3 (320 kbps), 173.55 Mb, 68:44 minutes. Full info & covers included.
Part1Part2

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Antonio Vivaldi – 12 Concertos Op.3 L’Estro Armonico


Antonio Vivaldi – 12 Concertos Op.3 L’Estro Armonico

Recorded in Konstanz between May & June, 1992

About these works:
L’Estro Armonico, Op.  3, (“Harmonic Inspiration” in Italian) is a collection of twelve concertos for 1, 2 and 4 violins written by Antonio Vivaldi in 1711. It largely augmented the reputation of Vivaldi as Il Prete Rosso; (The Red Priest). Vivaldi scholar Michael Talbot went so far as to say the works are “perhaps the most influential collection of instrumental music to appear during the whole of the eighteenth century”. The collection was mostly put together in a chronological order. These concerti are often called concerti grossi due to their use of a concertino-style ensemble (solo cello is often used). Johann Sebastian Bach later transcribed six concertos from this set. Concertos Nos. 3, 9 and 12 were arranged for solo keyboard and are cataloged as BWV 978, 972 and 976. Also, Concertos Nos. 8 and 11 became Bach’s Concerti for solo organ, BWV’s 593 and 596. Lastly, the four-violin concerto No. 10 was reworked into the concerto for four harpsichords and strings, BWV 1065.

The Artists:
St. Petersburg Soloists
Michail Gantvarg: conductor

Track List:
cd1:
01. Concerto No.01 in D major RV549 I Allegro (3:06)
02. Concerto No.01 in D major RV549 II Largo e spiccato (2:40)
03. Concerto No.01 in D major RV549 III Allegro (2:59)
04. Concerto No.02 in G minor RV578 I Adagio e spiccato (1:24)
05. Concerto No.02 in G minor RV578 II Allegro (2:09)
06. Concerto No.02 in G minor RV578 III Larghetto (3:34)
07. Concerto No.02 in G minor RV578 IV Allegro (2:43)
08. Concerto No.03 in G major RV310 I Allegro (2:09)
09. Concerto No.03 in G major RV310 II Largo (2:03)
10. Concerto No.03 in G major RV310 III Allegro (2:46)
11. Concerto No.04 in E minor RV550 I Andante (1:33)
12. Concerto No.04 in E minor RV550 II Allegro assai (2:30)
13. Concerto No.04 in E minor RV550 III Adagio (0:24)
14. Concerto No.04 in E minor RV550 IV Allegro (2:57)
15. Concerto No.05 in A major RV519 I Allegro (3:00)
16. Concerto No.05 in A major RV519 II Largo (1:43)
17. Concerto No.05 in A major RV519 III Allegro (3:02)
18. Concerto No.06 in A minor RV356 I Allegro (3:25)
19. Concerto No.06 in A minor RV356 II Largo (2:13)
20. Concerto No.06 in A minor RV356 III Presto (2:42)

cd2:
01. Concerto No.07 in F major RV567 I Andante (2:14)
02. Concerto No.07 in F major RV567 II Adagio (0:59)
03. Concerto No.07 in F major RV567 III Allegro (2:43)
04. Concerto No.07 in F major RV567 IV Adagio (0:37)
05. Concerto No.07 in F major RV567 V Allegro (1:56)
06. Concerto No.08 in A minor RV522 I Allegro (3:35)
07. Concerto No.08 in A minor RV522 II Larghetto e spirituoso (3:57)
08. Concerto No.08 in A minor RV522 III Allegro (3:54)
09. Concerto No.09 in D major RV230 I Allegro (1:43)
10. Concerto No.09 in D major RV230 II Larghetto (3:52)
11. LConcerto No.09 in D major RV230 III Allegro (2:24)
12. Concerto No.10 in B minor RV580 I Allegro (3:40)
13. Concerto No.10 in B minor RV580 II Largo-Larghetto-Adagio-Largo (1:45)
14. Concerto No.10 in B minor RV580 III Allegro (3:20)
15. Concerto No.11 in D minor RV565 I Allegro-Adagio spiccato e tutti-Allegro (3:47)
16. Concerto No.11 in D minor RV565 ILargo e spiccato (2:50)
17. Concerto No.11 in D minor RV565 IAllegro (2:34)
18. Concerto No.12 in E major RV265 I Allegro (2:59)
19. Concerto No.12 in E major RV265 II Largo (2:36)
20. Concerto No.12 in E major RV265 III Allegro (2:49)

Stereo, DDD, mp3 (320 kbps), 235.09 Mb, 103:16 minutes. Info & covers included.

Part1Part2Part3

Antonio Vivaldi – 12 Concertos Op.9 “La Cetra”


Antonio Vivaldi – 12 Concertos Op.9 “La Cetra”

Recorded at St. John’s, Smith Square, London in 1975 ( Two Concerts for wind instruments) & 1977 (“La Cetra”)

About these works:
La Cetra may not be as well known or as frequently recorded as either Vivaldi’s Op. 8 (including the Four Seasons) or Op. 3, L’Estro Armonico, but it is well worth having in your collection. These twelve concertos offer a great deal of rewarding music: beautiful serenades, haunting largos, and even an occasional melody borrowed from the Seasons, fitted out with a striking new accompaniment. In La Cetra, Vivaldi frequently achieves a new level of expressiveness combined with virtuosity which helped pave the way for devilish exploits of Paganini.

The Artists:
Academy Of St. Martin-In-the-Fields
Iona Brown: violin & conductor (for “La cetra”)
Neville Marriner: conductor (for the other two concerts)

Track List:
cd1:
01. Concerto No.1 in C maj, RV 181A – I. Allegro (3:41)
02. II. Largo (2:50)
03. III. Allegro (2:44)
04. Concerto No.2 in A maj, RV 345 – I. Allegro (4:17)
05. II. Largo (2:29)
06. III. Allegro (3:16)
07. Concerto No.3 in G minor, RV 334 – I. Allegro non molto (3:37)
08. II. Largo (3:22)
09. III. Allegro non molto (3:17)
10. Concerto No.4 in E maj, RV 263A – I. Allegro non molto (4:45)
11. II. Largo (3:03)
12. III. Allegro non molto (3:45)
13. Concerto No.5 in A minor, RV 358 – I. Adagio – Presto (3:40)
14. II. Largo (1:54)
15. III. Allegro (3:21)
16. Concerto No.6 in A maj, RV 348 – I. Allegro (3:52)
17. II. Largo (2:53)
18. III. Allegro non molto (5:17)
19. Concerto No.7 in B flat maj, RV 359 – I. Allegro (3:14)
20. II. Largo (2:21)
21. Concerto No.7 in B flat maj, RV 359 – Allegro (3:28)

cd2:
01. Vivaldi: Concerto No.8 in D minor, RV 238 – I. Allegro (3:53)
02. II. Largo (2:31)
03. III. Allegro (3:21)
04. Vivaldi: Concerto No.9 in B flat maj, RV 530 – I. Allegro (3:37)
05. II. Largo e spiccato (3:29)
06. III. Allegro (3:08)
07. Vivaldi: Concerto No.10 in G maj, RV263A – I. Allegro molto (3:53)
08. II. Largo cantabile (3:00)
09. III. Allegro (3:10)
10. Vivaldi: Concerto No.11 in C maj, RV 198A – I. Allegro (4:25)
11. II. Adagio (2:42)
12. III. Allegro (3:35)
13. Vivaldi: Concerto No.12 in B minor, RV 391- I. Allegro non molto (5:28)
14. II. Largo (2:51)
15. III. Allegro (4:33)
16. Concerto for 2 oboes in D minor, RV 535 (9:02)
17. Vivaldi: Concerto for piccolo in C maj, RV 443 (10:58)

Stereo, DDD, mp3 (320 kbps), 333.43 Mb, 144:42 minutes. Full info & covers.

Part1Part2Part3Part4

Antonio Vivaldi – 12 Concertos Op.4 “La Stravaganza”


Antonio Vivaldi – 12 Concertos Op.4 “La Stravaganza”

Recorded in 1963.

About these works:
La stravanganza (“The Extraordinary”) is a set of concertos, op.  4, written by Antonio Vivaldi in 1712-1713. The set was first published in 1714 and was dedicated to Vettor Delfino. All of the concertos were scored for solo violin, strings, and basso continuo; however, some of the movements in the concertos require extra soloists (like a second violin solo and/or a cello solo).
The violin concertos of La Stravaganza are remarkable for their range of colouration as the Vivaldi discards several vestiges of Corellian influence and reaches out with his own distinct style.  In La Stravaganza Vivaldi has achieved a remarkably high level of consistency and artistic quality from a real exhilaration in the allegros to a deep emotion in the central slow movements. I would single out the splendid concerto in F major, No. 9 as my favourite work. The foot-tapping and trotting pace of the opening movement allegro is infectious. In the central slow movement the somewhat mellifluous yet agitated solo violin against a gentle rocking rhythm is most appealing and the work concludes with a striking and furiously paced allegro. My favourite movement just has to be the meltingly beautiful largo from the concerto in D major, No. 11 which is simply irresistible and is a candidate for one of Vivaldi’s greatest hits. There have not been too many versions of La Stravaganza recorded over the years and consequently the Opus 4 set has remained in the shadow of other published collections such as L’Estro armonico Op.3, Il Cimento dell’armonia e dell’inventione, Op. 8 and La Cetra, Op.9.

The Artists:

Track List:

Stereo, ADD, mp3 (320 kbps), 266.09 Mb, 101 minutes. Info & covers included.

Part1Part2Part3

Antonio Vivaldi – Six Violin Concertos Op.12


Antonio Vivaldi – Six Violin Concertos Op.12

Recorded in 1997

About these works:
This album contains the second group of six concertos published in 1729 in Amsterdam by Le Cane, the series making, with Opus 11, published in the same year, the now usual set of twelve.

The Artists:
The Academy Of Ancient Music
Christopher Hogwood: conductor
Pavlo Beznosiuk: leading violin

Track List:
01. Concerto No.1 In G Minor – I Allegro (3:29)
02. Concerto No.1 In G Minor – II Largo (3:28)
03. Concerto No.1 In G Minor – III Allegro (3:12)
04. Concerto No.2 In D Minor – I Allegro (3:37)
05. Concerto No.2 In D Minor – II Larghetto (2:05)
06. Concerto No.2 In D Minor – III Allegro (2:38)
07. Concerto No.3 In D Major – I Allegro (2:17)
08. Concerto No.3 In D Major – II Grave (1:40)
09. Concerto No.3 In D Major – III Allegro (1:58)
10. Concerto No.4 In C Major – I Largo spiccato -[Allegro] (4:01)
11. Concerto No.4 In C Major – II Largo (1:56)
12. Concerto No.4 In C Major – III Allegro (2:33)
13. Concerto No.5 In B Flat Major – I Allegro (3:42)
14. Concerto No.5 In B Flat Major – II Largo (2:29)
15. Concerto No.5 In B Flat Major – III Allegro (3:15)
16. Concerto No.6 In B Flat Major – I Allegro (4:10)
17. Concerto No.6 In B Flat Major – II Largo (2:11)
18. Concerto No.6 In B Flat Major – III Allegro (3:52)

Stereo, DDD, mp3 (320 kbps), 123.47 Mb, 52.33 minutes. Full info & covers included.

Part1 —  Part2

Johann David Heinichen – Dresden Concerti


Johann David Heinichen – Dresden Concerti

Recorded at the Deutschlandfunk, Sendesaal, Köln between February and March 1992.

About the author:
Johann David Heinichen (17 April 1683 – 16 July 1729) was a German Baroque composer and music theorist who brought the musical genius of Venice to the court of Augustus the Strong in Dresden. Although Heinichen’s music is original, rhythmically exuberant and imaginative, it was inexplicably little known for a long time.
He was born in the small village of Crössuln, near Weissenfels. His father Michael Heinichen had studied music at the celebrated Thomasschule Leipzig associated with the Thomaskirche, served as cantor in Pegau and was pastor of the village church in Crössuln. Johann David also attended Thomasschule Leipzig. There he studied music with Johann Schelle and later received organ and harpsichord lessons with Johann Kuhnau. The future-composer Christoph Graupner was also a student of Kuhnau at the time. Heinichen enrolled in 1702 to study law at the University of Leipzig and in 1705-6 qualified as a lawyer (in the early 18th century the law was a favored route for composers; Kuhnau, Graupner and Georg Philipp Telemann were also lawyers). Heinichen practiced law in Weissenfels until 1709. However, Heinichen maintained his interest in music and was concurrently composing operas. In 1710, he published the first edition of his major treatise on the thoroughbass. He went to Italy and spent seven formative years there, mostly in Venice. In 1717, Heinichen became a colleague of Johann Sebastian Bach at the court of Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cöthen, then went on to be Kapellmeister to the Elector of Saxony. His pupils included Johann Georg Pisendel. In 1721, Heinichen married in Weissenfels and the birth of his only child is recorded in January 1723. In his final years Heinichen’s health suffered greatly and on the afternoon of 16 July 1729, he was buried in the Johannes cemetery after finally succumbing to tuberculosis. His music is enjoying a resurgence of popularity, with some of his masses and his final work, a Magnificat, now receiving some attention in the recording world.

About this recording:
Johann David Heinichen worked at the magnificent court of Dresden from 1717 until his death in 1729, and during the early careers of Bach and Telemann many chroniclers would have named him, not one of them, as Germany’s most renowned composer. This 1992 recording gained a great deal of attention when it was released, for at the time his music had not been much recorded. And it does not sound like Bach, like Telemann, or like the Italian models that Heinichen followed in the composition of music in the concerto grosso genre. His orchestra in the music here is large, sounding a bit like that employed by Handel in the Water Music and perhaps intended for outdoor deployment. There are solo passages for horns, oboes, violins, flute, and recorder, and the music’s textures have an appealing kaleidoscopic quality that emerges in full color in the historical-instrument rendition of Musica Antiqua Köln under Reinhard Goebel. There’s also a stolid quality to much of the thematic material, intensified by Goebel’s low-temperature interpretations; the Italianate style benefits from a bit more fire. Goebel makes a good case for the music in his booklet notes. If we want to understand Dresden, he writes, “that uncommonly peaceable German manifestation of absolutism, we should get to know the concertos of Johann David Heinichen: realistic and straightforward, unusually energetic and sumptuous, sometimes sweet but never weak, and never losing sight, in self-absorption, of their duty to represent the King-Elector to the world.” A few minutes with the Water Music will convince one of the need for music to be about something other than duty, but this disc still fills a space on the Baroque shelf and is certainly a must for anyone visiting Dresden’s increasingly large collection of restored treasures.

Track List:
cd1:
01. Concerto in F Seibel 234 – I- Vivace (2:32)
02. Concerto in F Seibel 234 – II- Adagio (0:44)
03. Concerto in F Seibel 234 – III- Un poco Allegro (2:23)
04. Concerto in F Seibel 234 – IV- Allegro (2:58)
05. Concerto in F Seibel 235 – I- Vivace (4:16)
06. Concerto in F Seibel 235 – II- Andante (2:24)
07. Concerto in F Seibel 235 – III- Presto (3:34)
08. Concerto in F Seibel 235 – IV- Alla breve (3:31)
09. Concerto in F Seibel 235 – V- Allegro (2:57)
10. Concerto in G Seibel 215 – I- Andante e staccato (3:16)
11. Concerto in G Seibel 215 – II- Vivace (3:07)
12. Concerto in G Seibel 215 – III- Largo (2:12)
13. Concerto in G Seibel 215 – IV- Allegro (3:34)
14. Concerto in G Seibel 214 – I- Vivace (2:35)
15. Concerto in G Seibel 214 – II- Largo (2:40)
16. Concerto in G Seibel 214 – III- Allegro (3:29)
17. Concerto in D Seibel 226 – I- Allegro (3:18)
18. Concerto in D Seibel 226 – II- Adagio (2:48)
19. Concerto in D Seibel 226 – III- Allegro (2:56)
20. Concerto in G Seibel 213 – I- Allegro (2:39)
21. Concerto in G Seibel 213 – II- Larghetto (3:05)
22. Concerto in G Seibel 213 – III- Allegro (3:17)
23. Concerto in G Seibel 213 – IV- Entrée (1:35)
24. Concerto in G Seibel 213 – V- Loure. Cantabile (1:42)
25. Concerto in G Seibel 213 – VI- Tempo de Menuet – Air italienne (3:12)
cd2:
01. Concerto F-dur Seibel 233 (3:11)
02. Concerto F-dur Seibel 233 (2:11)
03. Concerto F-dur Seibel 233 (3:21)
04. Concerto C-dur Seibel 211 (2:16)
05. Concerto C-dur Seibel 211 (2:33)
06. Concerto C-dur Seibel 211 (1:09)
07. Concerto C-dur Seibel 211 (2:10)
08. Concerto F-dur Seibel 231 (2:19)
09. Concerto F-dur Seibel 231 (2:49)
10. Concerto F-dur Seibel 231 (1:51)
11. Concerto F-dur Seibel 232 (2:25)
12. Concerto F-dur Seibel 232 (3:08)
13. Concerto F-dur Seibel 232 (2:25)
14. Concerto G-dur Seibel 217 (3:35)
15. Concerto G-dur Seibel 217 (2:40)
16. Concerto G-dur Seibel 217 (1:55)
17. Concerto G-dur Seibel 217 (6:47)
18. Concerto G-dur Seibel 214 (Venezia 1715) (2:58)
19. Concerto G-dur Seibel 214 (Venezia 1715) (3:02)
20. Concerto G-dur Seibel 214 (Venezia 1715) (3:35)
21. Adagio – Allegro (3:08)
22. Sonate A-dur Seibel 208 (1:39)
23. Sonate A-dur Seibel 208 (0:46)
24. Sonate A-dur Seibel 208 (0:57)
25. Moll Seibel 240: Vivace (3:04)

The Players:

Stereo, DDD, mp3, 320 kbps, 325.32 Mb, 2 hours 16 minutes. Covers & info included.

Part1 —–   Part2 —–   Part3 —–   Part4

Ludwig Van Beethoven – Concerto Et Romances Pour Violon Et Orchestre


Ludwig Van Beethoven – Concerto Et Romances Pour Violon Et Orchestre

About these Works:
Beethoven wrote his Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61 (1806), at the height of his so-called “second” period, one of the most fecund phases of his creativity. In the few years leading up to the violin concerto, Beethoven had produced such masterpieces as the Symphony No. 3, Op. 55 (1803), the Piano Concerto No. 4, Op. 58 (1805-1806), and two of his most important piano sonatas, No. 21 in C major, Op. 53 (“Waldstein,” 1803-1804), and No. 23 in F minor, Op. 57 (“Appassionata,” 1804-1805). The violin concerto represents a continuation — indeed, one of the crowning achievements — of Beethoven’s exploration of the concerto, a form he would essay only once more, in the Piano Concerto No. 5 (1809).
By the time of the violin concerto, Beethoven had employed the violin in concertante roles in a more limited context. Around the time of the first two symphonies, he produced two romances for violin and orchestra; a few years later, he used the violin as a member of the solo trio in the Triple Concerto (1803-1804). These works, despite their musical effectiveness, must still be regarded as studies and workings-out in relation to the violin concerto, which more clearly demonstrates Beethoven’s mastery in marshalling the distinctive formal and dramatic forces of the concerto form.
Characteristic of Beethoven’s music, the dramatic and structural implications of the concerto emerge at the outset, in a series of quiet timpani strokes that led some early detractors to dismiss the work as the “Kettledrum Concerto.” Striking as it is, this fleeting, throbbing motive is more than just an attention-getter; indeed, it provides the very basis for the melodic and rhythmic material that is to follow. At over 25 minutes in length, the first movement is notable as one of the most extended in any of Beethoven’s works, including the symphonies. Its breadth arises from Beethoven’s adoption of the Classical ritornello form — here manifested in the extended tutti that precedes the entrance of the violin — and from the composer’s expansive treatment of the melodic material throughout. The second movement takes a place among the most serene music Beethoven ever produced. Free from the dramatic unrest of the first movement, the second is marked by a tranquil, organic lyricism. Toward the end, an abrupt orchestral outburst leads into a cadenza, which in turn takes the work directly into the final movement. The genial Rondo, marked by a folk-like robustness and dancelike energy, makes some of the work’s more virtuosic demands on the soloist.
At the prompting of Muzio Clementi — one of the greatest piano virtuosi of the day aside from Beethoven himself — Beethoven later made a surprisingly effective transcription of the violin concerto as the unnumbered Piano Concerto in D major, Op. 61a, famously adding to the first movement an extended cadenza that employs tympani in addition to the piano.
Beethoven’s reputation as a pianist often obscures the fact that he was a very capable violinist. Although not an accomplished master, he possessed a profound love for and understanding of the instrument, evident in his ten violin sonatas, the violin concerto, and numerous quintets, quartets, and other chamber works. The two Romances for violin stand out because they are single-movement works in concerto settings. The Romance in G major was published in 1803 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel in Leipzig; the date of its first performance is not known. Despite the lower opus number, it was composed at least five years after the Romance in F, Op. 50, which was published in 1805. He retained the early Classical orchestra he employed for his earlier Piano Concerto in B flat, Op. 19: one flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, and strings. Often described as a “preparation” for the Violin Concerto, Op. 61, of 1806, the Romance in G stands as a fine work in its own right, clearly demonstrating Beethoven’s mastery of the high-Classical style of Mozart and Haydn. Furthermore, Beethoven creates subtle connections between disparate sections of a work.
Cast in a two-episode rondo format (ABACA coda), the Romance in G is not imbued with sonata-form characteristics, as are many of Beethoven’s later rondo movements. The rondo theme (A) is in two parts, each performed first by the soloist then repeated by the orchestra. Descending sixteenth notes in the solo part mark the beginning of B, in which the orchestra is relegated to a purely accompanimental role, creating unity by including figures from the rondo. Section B spends a significant amount of time on the dominant (D major); however, this does not represent a modulation but a preparation for the return of the rondo in G major. Again, the soloist performs both segments of the A section alone, this time including a running eighth note accompaniment under each of the literally repeated themes. Beethoven set the second episode, C, in E minor. The minor mode, dotted rhythms, and staccato passages give the section a “gypsy” music tinge. The foray into a new key area ends with the return of the G major rondo theme, again played by the soloist, but with accompaniment by the orchestra. Beethoven forgoes the repetition of each of the two parts of the rondo and ends the work with a brief coda featuring a lengthy trill in the solo violin. The three fortissimo chords that close the piece seem oddly, possibly comically, out of place in this generally quiet work, but they do resemble the orchestral string parts at the end of each rondo section.
Not published until 1805 (Bureau des Arts et d’Industrie, Vienna), the Romance in F was probably first performed in November 1798; so, although it bears the designation, “Romance No. 2, ” and a later opus than its G major sibling, it is actually the earlier of the two compositions. The orchestral scoring Beethoven chose for the Romance in F major is the same as that for his early Piano Concerto in B flat, Op. 19 (one flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, and strings). Possibly because of its early conception, the Romance in F is less adventurous in conception than the later Romance in G, Op. 40, and still includes lengthy transitions between sections. However, the Romance in F contains a richer harmonic vocabulary than its later counterpart.
As he would for his Romance in G, Beethoven chose a two-episode rondo format (ABACA coda) for the brief, lyrical Romance in F. The rondo section (A) features an antecedent-consequent theme performed first by the soloist, with orchestral string accompaniment, then by the entire orchestra. The melody itself is highly decorated, with numerous trills, turns and grace notes. A forceful, dotted-rhythm figure that closes each appearance of the rondo acts as a transition to the ensuing episode. Episode B maintains the lyric character of the rondo theme, adding large, dramatic leaps followed by descending scales and arpeggios. A glimpse of F minor precedes a literal return to the rondo, this time performed with a lighter accompaniment. The minor mode at the end of episode B proves to be portentous, as episode C begins in the tonic minor. Beethoven makes full use of the “flat” key area by presenting the rondo theme on D flat major, initiating an extended transition back to F major for the final return of the rondo theme. The coda, while never venturing from the tonic, acts as something of a summation when the soloist borrows the triplet motion prominent in episode C and performs a dramatic, trilled figure from the end of episode B.

Track List:
1. Concerto pour violon et orchestre en ré majeur op.61 / Allegro (25:39)
2. Concerto pour violon et orchestre en ré majeur op.61 / Larghetto (10:19)
3. Concerto pour violon et orchestre en ré majeur Op.61 – Rondo – Allegro (9:47)
4. Romance pour violon et orchestre – No.1 Romance en sol majeur (6:44)
5. Romance pour violon et orchestre – No.2 Romance en fa majeur (8:14)

The Artists:
Orchestra Philarmonica Slovenia
Alberto Lizzio: conductor
Alexander Pervomaisky: violin

Stereo, DDD, mp3, 320 kbps, 142.96 Mb, 60:43 minutes. Covers included.

Part1 —– Part2